Babà
Babbà al rhum or Rum baba is a rich small cake, tall and a bit narrowed at one side, soaked in liquor (rum, as a rule), sometimes filled with whipped cream or custard. This is the classical version, the very one that is usually called a traditional Neapolitan dessert. After all, before becoming a popular Neapolitan dessert, rum baba had been travelling from one country to another, from one culture to another, from one social layer to another for more than one century. Its “nomadic life” brought newer and newer meanings into it. The legend about this dessert’s birth narrates it is connected with the name of exiled king of Poland Stanisław Bogusław Leszczyński: he was said to be of ill temper and good appetite. Once he was served kugelhupf; the pastry tasted too dry and plain to him, so he threw the dish away breaking a bottle of rum. The pastry fell into it; he was so delighted that he named the cake after one of the heroes of his favorite book, Ali Baba from A Thousand and One Nights. Later, his chef refined the sweet bread by using brioche dough and adding raisins to the recipe. The dish was then simply called baba. The baba was brought to Paris by the king’s daughter, Maria Leszczyńska, who was French king Louis XV’s wife. After awhile baba came from Paris to Naples. One of the trendy tendencies born on Capri and Sorrento coast and having a good chance to become a tradition is using Limoncello liqueur instead of rum.

Babà

Babbà al rhum or Rum baba is a rich small cake, tall and a bit narrowed at one side, soaked in liquor (rum, as a rule), sometimes filled with whipped cream or custard. This is the classical version, the very one that is usually called a traditional Neapolitan dessert. After all, before becoming a popular Neapolitan dessert, rum baba had been travelling from one country to another, from one culture to another, from one social layer to another for more than one century. Its “nomadic life” brought newer and newer meanings into it. The legend about this dessert’s birth narrates it is connected with the name of exiled king of Poland Stanisław Bogusław Leszczyński: he was said to be of ill temper and good appetite. Once he was served kugelhupf; the pastry tasted too dry and plain to him, so he threw the dish away breaking a bottle of rum. The pastry fell into it; he was so delighted that he named the cake after one of the heroes of his favorite book, Ali Baba from A Thousand and One Nights. Later, his chef refined the sweet bread by using brioche dough and adding raisins to the recipe. The dish was then simply called baba. The baba was brought to Paris by the king’s daughter, Maria Leszczyńska, who was French king Louis XV’s wife. After awhile baba came from Paris to Naples. One of the trendy tendencies born on Capri and Sorrento coast and having a good chance to become a tradition is using Limoncello liqueur instead of rum.
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